Join us as we reflect within our own community about the contributions of Black Americans not only to our profession, but the foundation and fabric of our society. We hope to shine a light that our present and future may be enriched by our past, and never in danger of repeating it.

Join us as we reflect within our own community about the contributions of Black Americans not only to our profession, but the foundation and fabric of our society. We hope to shine a light that our present and future may be enriched by our past, and never in danger of repeating it.

Black Americans have made our country—and indeed the world—a better, stronger place for everyone. Often against the will and imbalance of power of the institutions that would have held them back, they challenged the odds and the limited foresight of society, pointing the way to a brighter future built on the ideals of our nation, where no one would be prevented from achieving their full potential by anything but their own desire.

This Black History Month, let’s make a concerted effort to learn from each other, understand the lessons of the past, both the glorious and the painful, and commit to not only celebrating the achievements of Black Americans, but to honoring their dedication and sacrifice—often against tremendous headwinds that would have grounded lesser spirits—by accepting their challenge to grow and rise above with them.

We hope the following insights and actions from our Cetera family and beyond will be an inspiration as you embark on your own reflection and celebration.

 
 

Caring Cetera Raises $240,000 (and Counting) for Diversity in Financial Planning Scholarship

To help encourage greater representation and access within our profession, Caring Cetera launched the Diversity in Financial Planning Scholarship, offering financial and mentorship support to students from communities traditionally underrepresented in financial services. To date, $240,000 has been raised to help deserving students pursue their financial planning career.
Learn More or Make a Donation

 

Suggested Reading

 

Few joys are as all-engrossing as the self-paced journey of discovery offered in the pages of a good book. The (very) short list below will help get you started with just a few that have captured the minds and hearts of some of us here at Cetera, but you can find a diversity of suggestions from The National Book Review, The Brookings Institution, and Shondaland. (Where feasible, we hope you will consider keeping your purchases local and supporting your nearby independent bookstore.)

The Heritage: Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism

by Howard Bryant
An enlightening look at the intersection of sports and politics that Kirkus Reviews calls “An appealing blend of sports history and provocative discussion of race and success, respect, and representation in America.”

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption

by Bryan Stevenson
A memoir by the lawyer who founded the Equal Justice Initiative, featuring the story of how Stevenson overturned the death sentence of a man falsely accused of murder, that NPR called a “…touchstone of criminal justice writing for helping change the conversation around capital punishment in America.”

Hidden Figures

by Margot Lee Shetterly
The “how did we not know that?” story of the Black women behind the success of the space race that Publishers Weekly says “…crafts a narrative that is crucial to understanding subsequent movements for civil rights.”

Suggested Watching

 

If you prefer to watch your books, both Just Mercy and Hidden Figures were made into critically acclaimed movies. Below are a few other films to add to your watchlist, and for movie buffs and cinephiles alike, see The New York Times’ list of 28 films to watch during the 28 days of Black History Month.

13th

directed by Ava DuVernay
This stark look at how the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution opened the doors to the prison industrial complex and the disproportionate incarceration of Black adults prompted Variety to declare that in it, “…you’re seeing an essential dimension of America with new vision.”

Mudbound

directed by Dee Rees
Against the backdrop of WWII, this epic tale of two poor families working the same land in Mississippi explores class, family, and race in a way that, as Rolling Stone extols, “…grabs you and won’t let go.”

Breaking the Huddle: The Integration of College Football

directed by Joe Lavine
This documentary that Variety called “crisp” and “memorable” explores the intersection of the Civil Rights Movement and college football through the eyes of those who experienced it firsthand.

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