Local Traditions, Global Cultures

Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate Latinx people’s outstanding contributions to global society and reflect on opportunities for positive change. It also shines a spotlight on Latinx leaders’ legacies and the need for greater inclusion of Latinx people in the workforce.

Local Traditions, Global Cultures

Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate Latinx people’s outstanding contributions to global society and reflect on opportunities for positive change. It also shines a spotlight on Latinx leaders’ legacies and the need for greater inclusion of Latinx people in the workforce.

From leadership on civil and workers’ rights, to lasting impacts across the arts, to trailblazing contributions throughout government, business, and science, the Latinx community—now over 60 million people in in the U.S.—has made all of our lives richer and more meaningful.

Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrated from September 15 – October 15 to coordinate with Latin American countries’ independence celebrations, is a time to reflect on such important contributions and acknowledge that we can do much more as allies. Organizations such as Lean In have documented that U.S. Latinx people continue to struggle with workplace disparities such as unequal pay. Consider this recent statistic: “Latinas in the U.S. are paid 45% less than white men and 30% less than white women.”1

We can all be part of positive change. The Smithsonian Latino Center is one place to explore online resources, including bilingual materials and history projects. On the website for The Latinx Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, you can find research, videos, podcasts and more that promote equity, justice and inclusion for the Latinx community.

At Cetera, we believe equal opportunity is critical for the improvement of our society and our greater well-being. This Hispanic Heritage Month, we invite everyone to highlight a Latinx leader in your community who is making a difference and share their story on social via #CeteraCelebrates.

We don’t need to look far for examples of how the Hispanic community has been instrumental to our collective growth and success. Hear from Hispanic members of the Cetera community about what they enjoy celebrating and sharing about their heritage.

Caring Cetera Raises $240,000 (and Counting) for Diversity in Financial Planning Scholarship

To help encourage greater representation and access within our profession, Caring Cetera launched the Diversity in Financial Planning Scholarship, offering financial and mentorship support to students from communities traditionally underrepresented in financial services. To date, $240,000 has been raised to help deserving students pursue their financial planning career.
Learn More or Make a Donation

Suggested Watching

 

There are a wealth of movies and documentaries that give insight into Latinx history, cultures and traditions. Here are a few that highlight pioneering leadership, renowned traditional musicians, and a rich cultural heritage. For more movies that explore the Latinx experience, check out PBS and see Women’s Health Magazine’s list of 22 best movies showcasing Latinx culture.

Cesar Chavez: History Is Made One Step at a Time

Director: Diego Luna
Stars: Michael Peña, America Ferrera, Rosario Dawson

Get inspired by this biopic about Cesar Chavez, the pioneering civil rights leader and labor organizer who fought for social justice for farmworkers through nonviolence and community organizing.

Buena Vista Social Club

Director: Wim Wenders
Stars: Compay Segundo, Ibrahim Ferrer, Rubén González

Journey to Havana with legendary Cuban musicians who are brought out of retirement by renowned guitarist Ry Cooder. Hear and see traditional Cuban and Latin American music being recorded.

Coco

Directors: Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina
Stars: Anthony Gonzalez (voice), Gael García Bernal (voice), Benjamin Bratt (voice)

Plan a family movie night and watch Pixar/Disney’s “Coco,” a story about an aspiring young musician who journeys through the land of the dead to learn the truth behind his family’s ancestral ban on music.

Suggested Reading

Gain an understanding of and appreciation for Latinx cultures by diving into the works of writers who have made a difference through their creativity and work. Discover stories about families and everyday life in Latinx communities, be inspired by tales of the human experience, and challenge your thoughts on identity through this brief reading list. If you’re looking for more, scroll through this list from Penguin Random House or check out Scholastic’s list of Hispanic Heritage Month books for young readers.

One Hundred Years of Solitude

by Gabriel García Márquez
Considered one of the most influential literary works for our time, One Hundred Years of Solitude tells the story of the rise and fall of the Columbian town of Macondo and its founders, the Buendía family.

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

by Junot Díaz
Oscar is a Dominican-American who grows up New Jersey and struggles his whole life to find a sense of community, identity and love, but is haunted by the fukú—a curse that has been in Oscar’s family for generations.

Borderlands / La Frontera: The New Mestiza

by Gloria Anzaldúa
As a Chicana-tejana-lesbian-feminist poet, theorist, and fiction writer from south Texas, Gloria challenges our understanding of borders as physical separators. Instead, she forces us to explore the psychological and social landscapes they shape.

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